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Posts for tag: Dental Implants

By All Smiles
January 03, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Implants  

If all you want is to cover gaps between your teeth for a fuller, more functional smile, dentures will do. They can be created to cover your entire gumline after complete tooth loss, or to superficially fill a space between two teeth. But if you are more concerned with your overall dental health and the stability of your teeth, ask a dentist at All Smiles in Worth, IL about dental implants instead!

The Function of Dental Implants
A dental implant's main function is to support a crown and restore a missing tooth. Each single implant replaces a single tooth, but they can also be used to support full denture devices. About two to four dental implants can provide ample support for permanently placed top and bottom dentures. Another function of an implant is to keep your remaining bone tissue strong and viable, for, over time, this tissue will disappear if it isn’t supporting a new tooth root.

Implantation Surgery
Having an implant placed is a minor surgical procedure that can be completed in one relatively short appointment at our Worth, IL, dental office. The implant, shaped like a screw, is deposited below the gumline in the space left vacant by your missing or extracted tooth. The implant is then secured by sutures so that it can have time to heal undisturbed through a process called osseointegration. It takes some time for the implant to be firm enough to support a crown (about a few months).

How Long Will They Last?
With good care, an implant can remain a part of your smile for decades. It’s as stable as the roots of your natural teeth. Pristine dental hygiene and yearly dental visits will allow you to keep all of your teeth (including the implant) for a lifetime. However, keep in mind that you may need to have the dental crown restored about every 10-15 years to ensure that it continues to look attractive.

Stabilize Your Smile
Dental implants provide you with an unmatched level of smile stability. Schedule time to have your teeth examined by a dentist at All Smiles in Worth, IL by calling (708) 448-0333 today!

By All Smiles
November 01, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Implants  

Dental implants are revolutionizing the way dentists treat tooth loss. Replacing both the roots of a missing tooth as well as the crown, implants are the most comprehensive dental restoration available, and the closest in design to a natural tooth. The dentists at All Smiles in Worth, IL, recommend implants for healthy adults missing any amount of teeth.

Get a Brand New Smile with Dental Implants in Worth, IL

There are two parts to a dental implant: the implant itself and the cosmetic crown. The implant is a small, biocompatible titanium screw that is surgically implanted in the socket of the missing tooth. Helping to secure the crown in place, the crown prevents the loss of healthy bone tissue in the gums—a common side effect of tooth loss and gum disease. The implant fuses with surrounding bone tissue through a process called osseointegration, and once this has healed, the cosmetic crown is attached.

Implants function and are cared for just like natural teeth, meaning that good oral hygiene and follow up dental care is important in order to prevent complications. With proper care, they have a very high success rate.

Are Dental Implants Right for You?

In order to qualify for dental implants, you must be an adult in good health. There must also be enough remaining bone tissue in the gums in order to support the implant. You must also be able to commit to maintaining a consistent oral hygiene routine at home, as well as attend regular check-ups and professional dental cleanings every six months.

Find a Dentist in Worth, IL

Dental implants can restore your smile, improve your oral health, and improve your quality of life. For more information and to learn if you qualify, contact All Smiles by calling (708) 448-0333 to schedule an appointment with one of our dentists today.

WhatYouShouldKnowAboutAntibioticTherapyBeforeImplantSurgery

Placing a dental implant within the jawbone requires a surgical procedure. For most people it’s a relatively minor affair, but for some with certain health conditions it might be otherwise. Because of their condition they might have an increased risk for a bacterial infection afterward that could interfere with the implant’s integration with the bone and lead to possible failure.

To lower this risk, dentists for many years have routinely prescribed an antibiotic for patients considered at high-risk for infection to take before their implant surgery. But there’s been a lively debate among health practitioners about the true necessity for this practice and whether it’s worth the possible side effects that can accompany taking antibiotics.

While the practice still continues, current guidelines now recommend it for fewer health conditions. The American Dental Association (ADA) together with the American Heart Association (AHA) now recommend antibiotics only for surgical patients who have prosthetic heart valves, a history of infective endocarditis, a heart transplant or certain congenital heart conditions.

But patients with prosthetic joint replacements, who were once included in the recommendation for pre-surgical antibiotics, are no longer in that category. Even so, some orthopedic surgeons continue to recommend it for their joint replacement patients out of concern that a post-surgical infection could adversely affect their replaced joints.

But while these areas of disagreement about pre-surgical antibiotics still continue, a consensus may be emerging about a possible “sweet spot” in administering the therapy. Evidence from recent studies indicates just a small dose of antibiotics administered an hour before surgery may be sufficient to reduce the risk of infection-related implant failure with only minimal risk of side effects from the drug.

Because pre-surgical antibiotic therapy can be a complicated matter, it’s best that you discuss with both the physician caring for your health condition and your dentist about whether you should undergo this option to reduce the infection risk with your own implant surgery. Still, if all the factors surrounding your health indicate it, this antibiotic therapy might help you avoid losing an implant to infection.

If you would like more information on antibiotics before implant surgery, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implants & Antibiotics: Lowering Risk of Implant Failure.”

CleanYourImplantsJustLikeyouCleanYourNaturalTeeth

Dental implants to replace teeth are a popular choice as much for their durability as their life-likeness. Most implants last for decades, which can result in lower long-term maintenance costs than other replacement options.

But to achieve this longevity, you must take care of your implants. You should brush and floss them daily right along with your remaining natural teeth — and continue regular semi-annual dental visits for cleanings and checkups.

You may be wondering, though: if they're made of inorganic materials, why worry with brushing them? It's true that bacterial plaque, the thin film of food particles most responsible for dental disease, doesn't affect them.

Your implants, though, don't exist in a bubble: they're imbedded in real bone, surrounded by real gum tissue and placed next to real teeth. All these other living tissues are susceptible to infection caused by plaque, even from plaque on non-organic implants.

The bone and tissues around an implant can even have a higher susceptibility to infection. This is because an implant's attachment in the jaw differs from that of natural teeth. An implant is imbedded directly into the bone; a natural tooth, on the other hand, maintains its hold through an elastic gum tissue between it and the bone called the periodontal ligament. Tiny fibers from the ligament attach to the tooth on one side and to the bone on the other.

Besides holding the tooth in place, the ligament also contains blood vessels that supply the tooth and surrounding tissues not only with nutrients but also antibodies that help fight infection. Due to the absence of a ligament connection, an implant doesn't enjoy the same level of protection from infection.  It's much easier for tissues and teeth around an implant to become infected, and harder to stop it.

That's why prevention through daily hygiene is so important. So, be sure to brush and floss all your teeth — including implants — every day, and keep up your regular dental visits. And at the first sign of a possible infection — swollen, red or bleeding gums — see us as soon as possible for an examination.

Consider your implants a long-term investment in both your smile and dental health. Taking care of them will pay dividends for many years to come.

If you would like more information on taking care of your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”

NewFrontTeethforaTeenagedDavidDuchovny

In real life he was a hard-charging basketball player through high school and college. In TV and the movies, he has gone head-to-head with serial killers, assorted bad guys… even mysterious paranormal forces. So would you believe that David Duchovny, who played Agent Fox Mulder in The X-Files and starred in countless other large and small-screen productions, lost his front teeth… in an elevator accident?

“I was running for the elevator at my high school when the door shut on my arm,” he explained. “The next thing I knew, I was waking up in the hospital. I had fainted, fallen on my face, and knocked out my two front teeth.” Looking at Duchovny now, you’d never know his front teeth weren’t natural. But that’s not “movie magic” — it’s the art and science of modern dentistry.

How do dentists go about replacing lost teeth with natural-looking prosthetics? Today, there are two widely used tooth replacement procedures: dental implants and bridgework. When a natural tooth can’t be saved — due to advanced decay, periodontal disease, or an accident like Duchovny’s — these methods offer good looking, fully functional replacements. So what’s the difference between the two? Essentially, it’s a matter of how the replacement teeth are supported.

With state-of-the-art dental implants, support for the replacement tooth (or teeth) comes from small titanium inserts, which are implanted directly into the bone of the jaw. In time these become fused with the bone itself, providing a solid anchorage. What’s more, they actually help prevent the bone loss that naturally occurs after tooth loss. The crowns — lifelike replacements for the visible part of the tooth — are securely attached to the implants via special connectors called abutments.

In traditional bridgework, the existing natural teeth on either side of a gap are used to support the replacement crowns that “bridge” the gap. Here’s how it works: A one-piece unit is custom-fabricated, consisting of prosthetic crowns to replace missing teeth, plus caps to cover the adjacent (abutment) teeth on each side. Those abutment teeth must be shaped so the caps can fit over them; this is done by carefully removing some of the outer tooth material. Then the whole bridge unit is securely cemented in place.

While both systems have been used successfully for decades, bridgework is now being gradually supplanted by implants. That’s because dental implants don’t have any negative impact on nearby healthy teeth, while bridgework requires that abutment teeth be shaped for crowns, and puts additional stresses on them. Dental implants also generally last far longer than bridges — the rest of your life, if given proper care. However, they are initially more expensive (though they may prove more economical in the long run), and not everyone is a candidate for the minor surgery they require.

Which method is best for you? Don’t try using paranormal powers to find out: Come in and talk to us. If you would like more information about tooth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Crowns & Bridgework,” and “Dental Implants.”